Whittier’s Idiosyncratic Relatives: Fame and its Effects on Those Close By

 
 

Whittier's Idiosyncratic Relatives: Fame and its Effects on Those Close By

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For many years, Whittier focused his writing on behalf of the abolition of slavery. Following the Civil War, Whittier wrote what was to become his most famous literary work, “Snowbound.”

Coming from modest circumstances that were made worse by the death of his father, Whittier’s fame and his subsequent financial security had a big affect on him. However, his fame had far more impact on his relatives’ lives, especially his grand-nephew, Greenleaf Whittier.

While Whittier never married, he did care for his relatives, particular nieces. Pickard, son of Greenleaf Whittier, describes the myriad of needs of J.G.W.’s extended family, his desire and obligation to meet them, as well as the challenges of one relative to distance himself from all that was “Whittier.”

DETAILS AND SPECS::

Booklet • 5.5″ x 8.5″ • 30 pages